Helix Fabric

Lake Oswego, Oregon installation


I am very happy with the sculpture -- a success!!









Picking up TODAY!


I got the sculpture ready for it's second application of powder coating.  The colors work much like ceramic glaze in a kiln, whereas there's a lot of guess work of the chemical reactions the pigment will have under heat.

Here's are some examples of the color application before firing.  One of the powder coat artisans who helps in this unique process commented, "The enamel you use is unlike any other.  It flows rather than stands up and bubbles.  You've got a good formula worked out."














 

Out of the Studio, On the Way to Color



Unfortunately I had some digital camera images, so images of the final sculpture are missing.  I would expect this coming week (last week in Feb.) the images will begin to roll again.

Pulling the sculpture into place by way of chains, straps and my two trucks.  The joints are being tacked and supported with welded braces.  Then I will cut cathedral joints into all points of attachments (fourteen in total).  Despite the fact it's all in heavy-duty steel, the outcome will appear light, colorful and WHIMSICAL!!







Matelasse is rolling... already heading for powder coat.  Here are some images of production.  Unfortunately I had some digital camera images, so images of the final sculpture are missing.  I would expect this coming week (last week in Feb.) the images will begin to roll again.



Here's more images of the first round of color for "Taffeta".   The concept is to let the color play, layer and dance.  It creates energy and whimsical motion to a very static piece of steel.









"Matelasse" is the next sculpture being built.  The pattern on the outer surface has been ground into the steel.  This is in preparation for the cutting of the waistband.





“Taffeta” the newest sculpture in the “Dancing Helix Moon” series and is ready for powder coating.  “Taffeta” is one of five works (five fabrics) that will depict the transition and evolution from fiber to metal.








The “Dancing Moon Helix” is inspired by an age-old sewing technique to create a skirt waistband.  By off-setting and sewing the short ends of a long strip of fabric, the waistband is created by trimming the strap from the circular off-set.  Now, I’ve done it metal.


Using a large roll at a local boiler-maker fabrication shop, the metal is rolled and welded, just as I did as a youngster putting together my first “wrap-around” skirt.  The giant metal strip is then pulled by chains and wedges into a continuous strip.  The result is a steel construction that bounces, sways and engages viewers.
As a contemporary sculptor, I have studied and practiced traditional needle arts including sewing, embroidery, knitting, crochet and tatting.  I deeply believe that to understand our modern culture you must first understand the traditions of the past.

It’s a cultural experience – mixing traditional craft and modern expectations.  It’s part of the artistic bent to show the evolution of tradition craft in a new contemporary light.

The proposed dimensions of the sculpture are approximately 4' x 9' x 5'.  The mounting surface will require a 4-foot-square pad or pedestal.  The sculpture will require no maintenance during the exhibition period.

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